The End of All Things

The End of All Things

Book One of the Celestial Serenade

Available on Kindle (and Kindle Unlimited) and in Paperback!

Gaia can’t forget the day the dragon descended over her city, laying waste to everything it saw. Humanity flees in terror of the alien weapon, but it traces their every movement, seemingly drawn by their technology to each of their gathering places.

With every nation on Earth affected by the attack, the survivors must find some way to unite if they’re going to reclaim their home. Gaia might have identified the seed of hope humanity needs. There’s just one problem – it’s buried beneath the precarious pile of rubble formed by the dragon’s first attack.

Alrayia dreams of the end of her world. While everyone celebrates the long awaited homecoming of Kantis, the Caltaran Empire’s greatest warrior, Alrayia convinces her husband, a member of the High Council, to build spaceships that might keep her nightmares from becoming reality.

She alone sees the Caltaran Empire teetering on a knife’s edge in the endless war against their bitter rivals, the Ruvalli. If the Ruvalli should gain the advantage – or if Kantis should fall – Alrayia’s world could well unravel. In her dreams, the final blow is delivered by a mechanical dragon of immense strength.

Can the dragon be defeated? Which civilizations will rise in the wake of its destruction – and which will fall?

And Liam thought DC was bad…
Liam Barrows turned to survey the dozen soldiers under his command. He didn’t think any had fallen behind, but he needed an excuse to glance away from the devastation. It was one thing to know the city had no warning; it was another to see it.

The dragon descended on Prague while people were still speculating about its origins on the news. Its destruction interrupted an ordinary day. Which threw the twelve hours D.C. spent evacuating into stark contrast. There had been fewer cars on the streets and fewer people in the buildings. The city had been at a standstill. People had known where to go, and soldiers had known what to expect.

“Keep close,” he barked. “We don’t know the stability of the buildings left standing. And despite Command’s presentation of the situation, this isn’t a race.” The remains of the U.S. government might want his unit to return with the girl and the array before the other teams comprising this international effort penetrated the perimeter, but Barrows wasn’t about to risk more lives.

As they slipped around the first rubble pile, the smell of old blood and decay hit Liam’s nose, mixed with the acrid stench of scorched earth and burnt metal. Bile rose in the back of his throat. The nearby bodies of uniformed soldiers served as a harsh reminder of how many lives had already been lost.

Liam took the lead with a twitchy, middle-aged lieutenant who looked as though he might never sleep again. The rest of the group fanned out behind him. A few were young enough he expected them to panic but, so far, they seemed stalwart.

Unlike back home, where most of the bodies had been clustered around barriers — and later retrieved for burial — death occupied every inch of Prague’s streets. Bodies hung from smashed cars and dotted the sidewalks outside the remains of high-rises. Their empty eye-sockets stared accusingly as the group shuffled past, as if demanding to know where they had been when the world went to shit.